What is HACCP Compliance?


What is HACCP Compliance?

HACCP stands for hazard analysis critical control point and is a management system that ensures food safety by analyzing and controlling biological, chemical, and physical hazards throughout the entire supply chain of a finished product.

What is HACCP Certified?

HACCP certification is an international standard that describes the requirements for ensuring control of food safety. Seven actions constitute this standard:

  • Conducting a hazard analysis of biological, chemical, or physical food hazards
  • Determining critical control points
  • Establishing critical control limits
  • Monitoring control of critical control points
  • Establishing remedying actions
  • Formulating and implementing procedures to verify that the HACCP system is functioning correctly
  • Record keeping

A food business can gain a HACCP certification by a reputable certification provider by undergoing an audit or assessment of its food safety policies and procedures, including:

  • Hygiene and overall cleanliness
  • Employed pest control measures
  • Safety and cleanliness of the equipment used to prepare or process food

–    Safety and cleanliness of product storage

–    Maintenance of vehicles

Why is HACCP Important?

A HACCP certification demonstrates to your customers, stakeholders, and regulatory authorities that you are committed to safe food trading or production. HACCP compliance is also mandatory for participants in the food industry in several countries, including the United States.

A HACCP certificate is also essential for a food business to be regarded as reputable and trade worthy. A company that is not HACCP certified runs a higher risk of making costly mistakes while carrying out their business activities.

Who Uses the HACCP?

Businesses don’t always obtain HACCP certificates for the same reasons. It is a condition of trade that business in the food industry, for example, food sellers and food manufacturers have HACCP certifications.

Although a HACCP certification is not a requirement for specific businesses or in some countries, many companies will make sure to have their certifications in place to mitigate risks and as a sound business practice.

What are the Most Common Critical Control Points?

A critical control point (CCP) is defined as a step at which biological, chemical or physical factors can be controlled.

Food Purchasing

Critical control point examples of food purchasing include checking suppliers, menu creation, and managing packaged and frozen foods.

Delivery and Receipt

This critical control point refers to temperature control, record keeping, and transferring food to storage after delivery.

Food Production

Food production critical control points concern food handling and preparation. Examples of food production essential points of control include allergen management, cooking, reheating, and thawing.

Service and Display of Food

There should be clean facilities to protect display food. The critical control requirements depend on whether the display is for hot, cold, or frozen food. Serving staff should also be adequately trained and furnished with clean equipment.

Food Storage

Food storage critical control points are of the utmost importance to prevent cross-contamination, bacteria growth, and temperature fluctuations. Brimich Warehousing & Logistics provides storage solutions that are HACCP compliant. Contact us today for more information.

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